Monday, July 11, 2011

Regency Era Fashions - Ackermann's Repository 1813

I'm a big fan of Regency Romances; so naturally I have a thing for the fashions of this time period and was thrill to discover these 200 year old prints from the English publication Ackermann's Repository.

I love the fact that I now have these great images as reference when I'm reading one of my novels. 
Now if I wonder what a half dress, morning dress or carriage costume looked like; 
I have these wonderful prints to give me a visual reference.

I'm so thrilled with these images that I even changed my blog background here and on my other 
"My Fanciful Muse" blog using some of the fashion figures from Ackermann's pages.
I'm already starting to create fun digital art using some of my favorites, 
so take a peek over on my "Muse" blog - for the grins and giggles of it.


This is my favorite fashion plate from the 1813 Ackermann's Repository issue


Description of plate 46 is for the Ball Dress shown above


This is my 5th installment of fashion plates from
Ackermann's Repository - Regency era magazine. 


Ackermann's Repository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, 
Manufacturers, Fashion and Politics.
was a popular publications in England from 1809-1829.
(The 1829 issues were printed as "Ackermann's Repository of Fashion".)

I have found the articles and illustrations to be a fascinating glimpse into that time period.
One of my favorite ongoing series in the magazine are the fashion plates.
Each monthly issue usually included 2 Fashion plates,
giving on average a total of 24 Fashion plates for the year.

Though the magazine was published monthly;
specially bound volumes were available from Ackermann's.
These "bound" book versions, consisted of a 2 volume set 
for each year it was in publication.


Ackermann's Repository "Bound" Series 1
ran from 1809 - 1815
 
with a total of 14 Volumes for Series 1

Series 1 Vol 8 was July - Dec 1812
Series 1 Vol 9 was Jan - June 1813
Series 1 Vol 10 was July - Dec 1813

Series 1 Vol 11 was Jan - June 1814
Series 1 Vol 12 was July - Dec 1814
Series 1 Vol 13 was Jan - June 1815
Series 1 Vol 14 was July - Dec 1815

Today I will be posting the fashion plates for the year 1813.
Series 1 Vol 9 was Jan - June 1813
Series 1 Vol 10 was July - Dec 1813

 I hope you enjoy!


 Ackermann's Repository 1813 Fashion Plates

1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - January Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - January Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - February Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - February Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - March Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - March Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - April Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - April Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - May Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - May Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - June Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 9 - June Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - July Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - July Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - August Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - August Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - September Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - September Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - October Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - October Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - November Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - November Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - December Issue


1813 - Ackermann's Repository Series1 Vol 10 - December Issue


 I hope you have enjoyed seeing another 24 ladies in high Regency fashion.

I find it  mind boggling that women dressed this way every day of their lives 
and how very different life was 200 years ago.

In our hustle-bustle lives we make due with "off the rack" 
this and that and if we are luck it fits us and looks good. 

Back in the Regency time clothing was custom made to fit a person.  
You picked a style, color, fabric and trims to suit you and if you wanted 
this or that changed on the main style, that would be done too.
Everything you would wear would be custom made to fit you perfectly; 
underwear, clothing, shoes, hats, reticules, hair accessories and even jewelry.


This is the original 1813 Ball Dress
So, if I were a lady of means in 1813 England and choosing a new garment at my 
favorite dressmakers establishment - I would choose this amazing ball gown.

I know white was a popular dress color in this time period; however, 
I'm a girl who likes color - so I would request a color change.


Here is the dress in a tranquil aqua

Here is the dress in a nice soft blue

Here is the dress in a pretty lilac
 I do enjoy playing with colors in Photoshop.
It's fun to see how the look of a dress changes 
based on a different color or shade.



Join me again next time when I post the Regency fashions of 1814.




Thanks for visiting me here at EKDuncan.blogspot.com

If you have enjoyed seeing these images from Ackermann's Repository 
and would like the opportunity to see and read an original for yourself 
they are are available on line at www.archive.org

Click HERE then choose the volume you are interested in.
You can then see and read them online or download 
them to your computer for future reference.
Enjoy!

6 comments:

  1. I'm so glad you are enjoying the ladies as much as I am. I hope to have the next set of Regency beauties posted in a day or so.

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  2. Love your art, thank you for sharing.
    Sharon

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  3. Thanks for letting me know you are enjoying the posts, and I'm so glad to be giving these 200 year old gals a new audience. Grins - Evelyn

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  4. How beautiful! Thank you for posting these.

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  5. I'm glad you are enjoying them Katherine. I've been posting Ackermann Repository images for the past few months and still have more to come.

    Grins,
    Evelyn

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