Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Regency Era Needlework Patterns from Ackermann's Repository 1816-1820

Welcome back to all of you who have been following with my Ackermann's Repository series of amazing Regency era images.  Today I'm thrilled to continue with more needlework patterns that were published between 1816 - 1820.   Until my discovery of this amazing publication I never imagined I would come across so many authentic Regency era patterns and I'm glad to have the opportunity to share them with you.

 I don't do much needlework myself; however I can see the crafting possibilities in so many of these patterns.  I hope you take the time to find some favorites of your own and create fun new art using them.


One pretty pattern from the September 1817 issue of Ackermann's Repository


Many Regency ladies spent their leisure time doing needlework projects of one type or another.  If you have ever wondered what kind of patterns they stitched then wonder no more for here is an assortment of 37 lovely patterns that were printed in England between 1816 and 1820.

Please note  - Ackerrmann's did not print a needlework pattern in every issue; 
however a majority of the issues over the course of each year did have them
and these are the patterns they did print during those years.

Enjoy!


37 Authentic Regency Era Needlework Patterns 
dating from 1816 - 1820

January 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

February 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

March 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

April 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

May 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

June 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

July 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

August 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

September 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

October 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

November 1816 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

March 1817 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

April 1817 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

August 1817 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

September 1817 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

October 1817 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

November 1817 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

December 1817 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

March 1818 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

April 1818 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

June 1818 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

July 1818 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

August 1818 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

September 1818 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

October 1818 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

November 1818 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

December 1818 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

February 1819 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

March 1819 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

April 1819 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

June 1819 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

August 1819 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

November 1819 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

February 1820 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

March 1820 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

April 1820 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

November 1820 - Ackermann's Repository Needlework Pattern

I can just image sitting by a cozy fire on a cold Regency night while taking needle and thread to a garment and giving it a personal touch using any of the above patterns.  Not only were articles of clothing embellished in such a manner but so were items for the household.  There were bed linens, cushions, pillows seat covers, table linens and more that Regency women would embellish to show their talent of applying clean stitches as any accomplished genteel lady should be able to do.

Thanks God in this modern age, ladies don't need to be able to stitch to perfection to prove their worth; however I still find these patterns worthy to use in my modern digital art creations and I hope you find a use or two for them as well.  I know the original artist would be glad to know their work of old was still found to be entertaining and useful almost 200 years after they were created.


Please visit my previous post to see how I turned some of the Ackermann
needlework patterns into digital scrapbook background papers.


 There's still more needlework patterns still to come so please check back.



Thanks for visiting me here at EKDuncan.blogspot.com

If you have enjoyed seeing these images from Ackermann's Repository 
and would like the opportunity to see and read an original for yourself 
they are are available on line at www.archive.org

Click HERE then choose the volume you are interested in.
You can then see and read them online or download 
them to your computer for future reference.
Enjoy!

8 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I'm so glad you like them, thanks for letting me know - Enjoy!

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  2. I love them too! They have proved very useful in decorating some Regency costumes I have been making!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh that is so cool!

    I thought these patterns were great when I first found them and have used them to create "digital" designs; but I'm thrilled to know that you have been able to use them as originally created - needlework patterns on Regency era clothing.

    I played a bit on your blog (http://teainateacup.wordpress.com/) and thought it was great, since I love all things "Regency". Thanks for the link back to my blog that you have on your Feb 8th post, it is appreciated.

    Grins and Giggles,
    Evelyn

    ReplyDelete
  4. No worries! There will probably be more links to come, as I have a few more Regency embroidery projects going! At the moment I am embroidering a Regency letterbook. My embroidery skills are getting all dusted off and used again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cool!!! I can't wait to see more of your work and am so glad you are finding these vintage patterns useful.

      Cheers,
      Evelyn

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  5. These are great! Thanks for posting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so welcome Carol. I'm glad you are enjoying them.

      Grins,
      Evelyn

      Delete