Thursday, October 13, 2011

Regency Era Needlework Patterns from Ackermann's Repository 1826 - 1828

When ladies embroidered in the Regency period their work could be done in colored threads and yarns or also white on white - this type of embroidery is known as Whitework.  

A large percentage of Regency dresses created were in white, especially for the unmarried ladies and to allow them to be interesting embroidery, trims and other accents were needed to keep them from being dull and boring.  One common used form of embroidery for interest was Whitework.

Whitework  - embroidering white thread on white fabric - was often done on cambric or fine muslin for dresses, cuffs, collars, handkerchiefs, bed linens,tablecloths and baby clothes.  Family would pass down an exceptional embroidered christening gown as an heirloom, these were usually done in whitework.

A lovely Muslin Pattern from Ackermann's Repository August 1827 Issue

 Muslin fabric of the Regency was a finely woven light cotton fabric and came in several weights. The muslin we see in stores today is inferior to what the muslin fabric used by gentility was 200 years ago. Regency era muslin was of a much finer and delicate weave then its modern counterpart. Muslin was highly suited to embroidery work; which is one of the reason so many of the Ackermann's Repository needle work patterns are listed as Muslin Patterns.  I'm sure a great many of these patterns were executed as whitework.  (for those who would like a visual  - A lovely example of a whitework embroidered muslin evening dress can be seen at the bottom of this post)


Ackermann's Repository did not always print a needlework pattern in every monthly issue in earlier years; however for the final three years of 1826 - 1828 there was one in every issue.  This just goes to show patterns for needlework and embroidery were popular and desired by the readers.


 I'm now thrilled to share with you the last of the needlework patterns that were 
in the 1826 - 1828 issues of Ackermann's Repository.

Enjoy!


36 Authentic Regency Era Needlework Patterns 
dating from 1826 - 1828

January 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

February 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

March 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

April 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

May 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

June 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

July 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

August 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

September 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

October 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

November 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

December 1826 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

January 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

February 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

March 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern


April 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

May 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

June 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

July 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

August 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

September 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

October 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

November 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

December 1827 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

January 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

February 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

March 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

April 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

May 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

June 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

July 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

August 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

September 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

October 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

November 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern

December 1828 - Ackermann's Repository Embroidery Pattern


I'm sure Regency ladies had a large personal collection of patterns such as these
and were thrilled to add a new one with each issue of Ackermann's Repository.

 Here is a lovely example of how embroidery patterns like those found in
Ackermann's Repository would change a plain dress into a work of art.
This evening dress is from the collection at the Metropolitan Museum.

Example of Whitework Embroidered Evening Dress

Ackermann's Repository published it's first 2 needlework patterns in 1811 and with their success published 11 in 1812.  For the most part a needlework or decorative pattern of some type was found in most issue of Ackermann's Repository between 1811 and 1828.  For the years of 1819 - 1821 there were fewer of the needlework patterns and more of the decorative arts patterns. Then by 1826 there was a needlework pattern in every issue till the final installment on December 1828.

Here are some quick links to see the other patterns I've posted
Regency Embroidery Patterns 1826 - 1828 - current post

(what I like to do with these Ackermann's Patterns)

My next post will be to show the decorative arts patterns that appeared in place of needlework patterns so I hope you join me again next time for more great finds from Ackermann's.

till next time...


Thanks for visiting me here at EKDuncan.blogspot.com

If you have enjoyed seeing these images from Ackermann's Repository 
and would like the opportunity to see and read an original for yourself 
they are are available on line at www.archive.org

Click HERE then choose the volume you are interested in.
You can then see and read them online or download 
them to your computer for future reference.
Enjoy!

2 comments:

  1. These are breathtakingly lovely. I could just stare at them all day. Thank You ever so much for sharing them, Evelyn!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mel - Thanks for letting me know you enjoyed seeing the vintage patterns. I think they are a treasure too and am glad to share.

      Grins,
      Evelyn

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